“Paying attention to how you’re bleeding is a good way to find out about other health conditions in your body,” says Leah Millheiser, MD, an ob-gyn and director of the Female Sexual Medicine Program at Stanford University. Here we have a few bleeding patterns to observe-

What Do Your Periods Say About Your Health?
What Do Your Periods Say About Your Health?

1. IF YOUR PERIOD BLOOD LOOKS BRIGHT RED IN COLOR –

The blood seems bright red in color? Well, bright red blood often means that you are simply at the beginning of your cycle. So this is nothing to worry about.

2. IF YOUR BLOOD IS BROWNISH –

Brownish blood is said to be older blood that has been in your uterus for a long time. It’s had a chance to oxidize, so it’s not as bright. Or it could be IUD if you’re shedding a smaller amount of the uterus lining every month, which means that the blood stays in there for a lot longer.

3. IF YOU’VE GOT SOME CLOTTING –

Blood clots are dark and thick, that can be seen either during your heavy period flow or could be any other reason too, but are generally not a thing to be worried about. Clotting usually occurring during heavy period flow are said to be a normal function unless they are spotted all the time and also if the size of these clots is more than the size of a quarter(~ more than 2 cm), it could be worrisome, other than that it is totally fine. But if you spot large clots on a regular basis, they might be a sign of a serious problem and you must consult your doctor soon. Clotting could also be happening because of early pregnancy, PCOS etc.

READ  9 Things Women Should Absolutely NOT Do When They Are On Their Periods

4. IF YOUR CYCLE IS IRREGULAR –

Irregular periods could be quite normal for few people but there are many factors that could lead to your irregular flow for eg, stress. If you are stressed, your body releases higher stress hormone. Another reason could be that you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is a hormone disorder. Women with PCOS/PCOD do not ovulate every month, that means they might not get periods every month.

5. Extremely Painful Cramps –

Well, most of the time a cramp could be just a cramp. But if your cramps are getting incredibly painful, then they could be a sign of a medical condition called endometriosis, which happens when cells that usually line the inside of your uterus, starts growing outside of it, and that misplaced tissue line thickens and breaks down and bleeds every single month causing painful cramping. It responds in the same way that causes you to have your period in the first place. So if in case your cramps are getting increasingly painful and difficult to handle, you must discuss with your doctor to figure out what’s going on.

Certain medicines can affect the menstrual bleeding you’re experiencing, too. Non-hormonal, copper IUDs can lead your period to be heavier than usual, and a few birth control pills and the Depo-Provera shot can also change the way you bleed, too. So if you’re bothered, do consult your gyno to figure it out.



Comment